Posted by: Valentino Radman | February 14, 2010

Tomislav Krizman

Tomislav Krizman (1882-1955) was Croatian pioneer of modern graphic and industrial design, painter and both costume and stage set designer. However, much like Menci Klement Crnčić he was above and before all a master drafstman and an exquisite engraver.

During his study at Trading Academy, he took classes with Bela Čikoš-Sesija, Robert Auer and Menci Klement Crnčić. Then he went to Vienna enrolling at the School of Arts and Crafts and the Academy. Krizman stayed in Austria’s capital for ten years and that period (1902.–1911.) was the most important part in his artistic development. He frequented the circles of the Viennese avantgarde elite and adopted the ideas of Secession. Krizman took part in their exhibitions as well; in Jungbund, Hagenbund, Secession and Künstlerhaus.
Upon returning to Croatia he works as a teacher, first at Zagreb School of Crafts, then from 1922 on, at the Engraving Department at the Academy. He was one of the founders of Zagreb Spring Salon (1916).
Though Krizman worked in oil and tempera as well, his forte was engraving. He liked to travel, and during his numerous voyages he made many drawings which served as a basis for later engravings. Besides “usual” destinations he traveled to more exotic parts of Balkans as well – Bosnia, Herzegovina, Macedonia…
Krizman was master portraitist as well. In 1952 he published a book on printing and engraving techniques. Krizman exhibited in Zagreb, Ljubljana, Vienna, Paris and Rome.

Venice, 1913

Portraits of Marya Delvard, 1908 and    Juro Tkalčić, 1923

Old Bridge, 1913

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: